Archivi categoria: 3d

What Would You Do With An Industrial AI Platform?

What Would You Do With An Industrial AI Platform?
By Caleb Kraft

Get ready to start thinking on a whole different level. With the E-RT3, you could be doing automation with some of the toughest and most robust hardware in the world. In this contest, Make: Community along with Yokogawa challenge you to come up with interesting projects for their automation platform. […]

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February 24, 2021 at 05:00PM
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Maker (Faire Producer) Spotlight: Enrique Saavedra Martínez and Marcos Saavedra

Maker (Faire Producer) Spotlight: Enrique Saavedra Martínez and Marcos Saavedra
By Jennifer Blakeslee

“Don’t think too much and make it happen!”

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February 24, 2021 at 12:22AM
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Shift 5% of Workforce Training Funds to Advance Entrepreneurship

Shift 5% of Workforce Training Funds to Advance Entrepreneurship
By Make Community

America’s economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic requires new business growth. An estimated 60% of business closures due to the pandemic appear to be permanent, and new businesses create virtually all job growth in America. Here’s one solution: shift 5% of government workforce training funds to support entrepreneurs. That shift […]

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February 23, 2021 at 11:08PM
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The Very Slow Movie Player

The Very Slow Movie Player
By Caleb Kraft

Ambient cinema is the perfect lockdown project

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February 23, 2021 at 05:00PM
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Outside the Box: Nick Seward’s Experimental 3D Printers Work Unlike Anything Else

Outside the Box: Nick Seward’s Experimental 3D Printers Work Unlike Anything Else
By Caleb Kraft

Nick Seward experimental 3D printers work unlike anything else.

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The post Outside the Box: Nick Seward’s Experimental 3D Printers Work Unlike Anything Else appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

February 22, 2021 at 05:00PM
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10,000 Bricks And An AI Comprise This Ultimate Lego Sorting Machine

10,000 Bricks And An AI Comprise This Ultimate Lego Sorting Machine
By Caleb Kraft

Built entirely from bricks, this machine can identify and sort any Lego part made, ever

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February 22, 2021 at 05:00PM
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Stochastic Markov Beats

Stochastic Markov Beats
By Matthew Carlson

[Attoparsec] has been building intriguing musical projects on his YouTube channel for a while and his latest is no exception. Dubbed simply as “Node Module”, it is a rack-mounted hardware-based Markov chain beat sequencer. Traditionally Markov chains are software state machines that transition between states with given probabilities, often learned from a training corpus. That same principle has been applied to hardware beat sequencing.

Each Node Module has a trigger input, four outputs each with a potentiometer, and a trigger out. [Attoparsec] has a wonderful explanation of all the different parts and theories that make up the module at the start of his video, but the basic operation is that a trigger input comes in and the potentiometers are read to determine the probabilities of each output. One is randomly selected and fired. As you can imagine, there are loops and even dead-end nodes and for some musical pieces there is a certain number of beats expected, so a clever reset signal can be sent to pull the chain back to the initial starting state at a regular interval. The results are interesting to listen to and even better to imagine all the possibilities.

The module itself is an Arduino-based custom PCB that is laid out quite cleanly. The BOM, code, and KiCad files are available on GitHub if you want to make one yourself. This isn’t the first instrument we’ve seen [Attoparsec] make, and we’re confident it won’t be the last.

Thanks [smellsofbikes] for sending this one in!

February 20, 2021 at 01:01PM
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Launching an Open Source Keyboard; System76 has Published Their Design Files

Launching an Open Source Keyboard; System76 has Published Their Design Files
By Kerry Scharfglass

System76, a computer manufacturer known for selling machines which run Linux, recently unveiled the complete sources for their forthcoming Launch mechanical keyboard. Made with familiar tools, mass produced, and backed by a stable company it looks like the Launch will be a compelling entrant into the world of mechanical keyboards.

Back in March of 2020 System76 published a blog post about a new project they were embarking on; a mechanical keyboard with an unusual layout. At the time there was scant information available besides a summer 2021 target and little was heard until last week when they opened up access to the Launch repository. Everything should be recognizable if you’ve ever looked at the sources for a customized mechanical keyboard before, which is what gets our attention. Electrical sources are authored with KiCad and should be easy to tweak or fabricate. And mechanical components are provided in STEP files with mechanical drawings, presumably because they intend to actually manufacture these.

launch-chassis.pngFeature wise all the usual hallmarks of a well designed keyboard are here. The Launch uses hostswap sockets to make it easy to install the usual Cherry MX compatible switch options, and includes per-key RGB backlighting courtesy of SK6805 LEDs. The ATmega32U4 runs the popular and extremely capable QMK firmware instead of something bespoke, so it should be easy to customize to the user’s desire.

System76 touts an unusual key layout, but if you’ve seen a 75% keyboard before it shouldn’t be too threatening (though we do wonder about that shrunken right shift). The most unusual feature is that it features a USB hub capable of full speed 10 gigabit USB 3.1 Gen 2 on two USB-C and two USB-A ports. It’s worth checking out the schematic to appreciate how much more complicated the hub design is than the rest of the keyboard, which is practically vestigial in comparison.

The remaining unknown is how the Launch integrates with Pop!_OS, System76’s awkwardly named remix of Ubuntu. They promise deep, compelling integration and we’re excited to see how that manifests.

February 20, 2021 at 10:01AM
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Writing Pretty Flux Patterns To Old Floppy Disks

Writing Pretty Flux Patterns To Old Floppy Disks
By Lewin Day

Floppy disks are rapidly aging, and archivists are working hard to preserve what data is left. This has led to the development of advanced floppy controllers capable of capturing the raw flux data from disks. [bzotto] was experimenting with the Applesauce archival hardware, and had some fun with the tools.

The result is a highly esoteric Easter egg. [bzotto]’s Picturedsk tool takes a bitmap image as input, and imprints that image into the magnetic flux of the disk. Thus, when viewing a dump of the disk’s magnetic flux on an archival program, the hidden image will be revealed. As an extra treat, it also writes a 1-bit version of the image to track 0, along with a barebones Apple ][ program to display the image and implore the user to investigate further.

It’s a fun hack that we could imagine being used as part of a game at a retro computing con, when we get to go back to those of course. We’ve seen Applesauce used before, too. If you’ve got your own archival projects on the go, be sure to let us know!

February 20, 2021 at 07:00AM
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3D Print Your Next Antenna

3D Print Your Next Antenna
By Al Williams

Building antennas is a time-honored ham radio tradition. Shortwave antennas tend to be bulky but at VHF frequencies the antenna sizes are pretty manageable. [Fjkaan’s] 2 meter quadrifilar helicoidal antenna is a good example and the structure for it can be created with 3D printing combined with electrical conduit.

Many people, including [G4ILO] use PVC pipe for the structure, and that design inspired [Fjkaan]. Despite being a bit less substantial, the conduit seems to work well and it is easy to cut. The helical design is common for satellite work owing to its circular polarization and omnidirectional pattern.

A quadrifilar helicoidal antenna is really two antennas in one, with a phase difference of 90 degrees between the two. There are several ways this can be accomplished, but in practice, most of these antennas use different loop sizes for the two antennas. One loop will be a bit larger than the frequency of interest, and thus will be inductive. The other loop will be a little smaller, and therefore will exhibit capacitive reactance at the center frequency.

Even though the antennas are both reactive, in parallel, the reactances cancel leaving a nice resistive load to match the radio. The feed at the top, however, needs to balance through some form of balun or choke.

We’ve seen these antennas do great things before. If you need a satellite receiving primer, we saw a good one last year.

February 20, 2021 at 04:00AM
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